Sunny Happy Skies Paper Piecing Quilt

Posted by jessica on Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Sunny Happy Skies Paper Piecing Quilt

Instructor: Jessica O.

 

Paper piecing is a great way to quilt. All your lines will end up straight whether or not you cut straight lines. I used a very basic pattern so you could get your feet wet with this technique. But I think there is enough going on here, you can challenge yourself with color selection if you would like to.

 

 

 

 

Fabric Selection:

I like to use a lot of different fabrics in my quilts. So in my sample you will see that Iu have used multiple fabrics. I even mixed fabric lines. All of these are Riley Blake Fabrics, but I used “Sunny Happy Skies,” “Sublime",” Indian Summer,” and “Sugar and Spice.” If you would like to simplify your project pick one of the fabric lines and stick to it. I added a solid (Pink) to give the eye a place to rest.

 

                  

Supplies:

Fabric:

  • Solid- 2 yards
  • Focal-1 1/4 yards
  • Accent Color-1 1/4 yards ( can be multiple colors equaling ½ yard total)
  • Sashing- 1 1/4 yards
  • Cornerstones- 1/4 yards (Will need extra if you want to fussy cut pandas)
  • Border #1- 1/2 yard
  • Border #2-
  • Binding- 1 yard
  • Backing-5 1/8 yards

Other Supplies:

  • Batting 72”X90”
  • Tread to match
  • Glue stick or pins
  • Sewing machine
  • Standard quilting supplies IE, Scissors, Rotary cutter, mat and ruler.
  • Printer/Copy machine
  • Paper (You can go to a quilting store and buy special paper piecing paper that tears away easily, but I buy the cheapest kind of paper I can at the office supply store to save money. Usually the less the paper costs, the easier it will tear and this is what you want.
  • Light box or other good light source

Cutting instructions:

I like to check my fabric for creases and wrinkles before I start cutting. Pressing the fabric will help remove wrinkles and creases. I use a light starch to give body to the fabric, and help stabilize it during the sewing stage.

Using Rotary cutter, mat and ruler cut each pieces of fabric into strips following the chart below.

 

 

I have found it helpful to cut the strips from one fabric and then subcut (the next step) into squares before I remove the fabric from the mat. This keeps all my fabric in straight lines for the second cut without distorting the first cut.

Fabric

Total number of strips

Strip size: By width of fabric

 

#3 Main fabric (Solid pink)

10

7.5”

#2 accent fabric (Floral)

7

5.5”

#1 accent fabric (I used a mix of fabrics to add interest)

7

5.5”

Sashing strips

3

12.5”

Cornerstones

2

2.5”

Boarder #1

8

1.5”

Boarder #2

8

3.5”

 

 

 

I have found it helpful to cut the strips and then subcut into squares before I remove the fabric from the mat. This keeps all my fabric in straight lines for the second cut without distorting the first cut.

Fabric

Total number of Squares

Square size

 

#3 Main fabric (Solid pink)

40

7.5” X 7.5”

#2 accent fabric (Floral)

40

5.5” X 5.5”

#1  accent fabric (I used a mix of fabrics to add interest)

40

5.5” X 5.5”

Sashing strips

49

12.5” X 2.5”

Cornerstones

35

2.5” X 2.5”

Boarder #1

None

Length will be determined after the quilt   top is complete

Boarder #2

None

Length will be determined after the quilt   top is complete

 

Once you have cut all of one fabric into squares, leaving the fabric on the cutting board, cut the squres in half on the diagonal in one direction.

 

Your fabric should look something like this:

 

 

Now follow the same cutting instructions for fabrics 1, 2, and 3.

 You should have the following:

80 Triangles of each fabric #1, #2, and #3. You can see that I have one stack of 80 pink triangles, one stack of 80 White with flowers triangles and five other stacks of triangles. I wanted to mix it up some so my fabric #2 was split into 5 different colors. This takes a little more attention when cutting but adds some interest to the finished quilt. If you were to use one fabric or more than one fabric for #2 you will need a total of 80 triangles.

 

 

Cut sashing and corner stones in the same manner excluding the diagonal cuts. Set these pieces aside until the blocks are assembled.

Now you’re ready to start sewing… almost :) 

Print and/or copy the attached PDF file.

       Printer Friendly Version     

To make sure you have printed or copied the file at the right size, measure the block it should equal 6”X6”.

 

 

You will need a total of 80 copies of the pattern.

Set up your sewing station for paper piecing. Have a cutting board and iron with ironing board close by while working.  You can find directions to make your own ironing board to fit any space at my Blog http://mamajamaquilts.blogspot.com/2011/12/diy-easy-ironing-board-of-any-size.html

I also like having a cutting mat with a sharp bladed rotary cutter and small ruler close by.  You could make due with a pair of sharp scissors.

Having a good light source is a necessity when paper piecing. A light box is the best option, a light or a bright window can make due.

 

Now you are ready to start sewing!

+Using a glue stick or pin attach fabric #1 with wrong side of paper to wrong side of fabric. I use a dot of glue. When the blocks are sewn the fabric will be pulled away from the paper. 

 

Check that the #1 fabric triangle is covering the #1 triangle on the paper. This is where the light box comes in handy. Holding the paper and fabric to a light or window will also do.

 

*Layer fabric #2 on top of fabric #1 with right sides together. You sould have a sandwich of paper face down = bottom, fabric face up = middle and fabric face down = top.

 

Shortening your stitch length at this time will help perforate the paper and make it easier to tear when it is time for removal.

Carefully turn the paper over so it is right side up on the top side and start sewing on the line between triangle 1 and 2.

 

Finish sewing after you have passed at least .25” past the outside boarder line.

Remove paper and fabric from the machine.

  • Check the fabric side to see if you caught both layers of fabric in sewing.
  • Also hold the square to the light to make sure the fabric covers the triangle and hangs over by at least .25” on all sides of the boarder

 

Fold paper away from facric on the sewing line.

Trim to a .25” seam allowance with the rotary cutter. You can opt for scissors and guestimate .25” seam allowance.

            

                                                                       Before                                                                                                 After

Trim the stray treads and press the fabric so that it is open.

 

The following instructions will follow the previous instructions starting at the * But this time you are adding the last and final triangle.

Layer fabric # 3 covering fabric 1 and fabric 2 with right sides together.

Carefully turn the paper to the top side and start sewing on the line between triangle 1-2 and 3. Start and end sewing at least a .25” past the outside boarder line.

Remove paper and fabric from the machine.

  • Check the fabric side to see if you caught both layers of fabric in sewing.
  • Also hold the square to the light to make sure the fabric covers the triangle and hangs over by at least .25” on all sides of the boarder

 

Fold back paper and trim to a .25” seam allowance with the rotary cutter. You can opt for scissors and guestimate .25” seam allowance.

Trim the stray treads and press seam allowance to one side.

Turn paper right side up and trim .25” around the outside border on all four sides.

 

  

 

Repeat from +for all 80 squares. I like to set up so I can do all of one step at once i.e., glue all 80 pieces of fabric #1 to all 80 pieces of paper then move to sewing on all 80 pieces of fabric 2 onto fabric 1 and so on. 

Some people like to leave the paper on the fabric for the next step. This is completely acceptable and even helpful. When you leave the paper attached to the fabric it will hold the fabric from stretching and distorting.

However, I like to remove the paper first and then assemble the block. First crease back the #3 triangle at the sewn line. I like to drag my fingernail along the sewn line. This weakens the paper and allows it to rip easier. 

Carefully rip the paper away. First remove Triangle #3 and then #2 and lastly #1

I find it helpful to lay out the square how it will look when it is finished next to my sewing machine. This helps me keep all the squares facing the same direction.There is nothing worse that sewing all the squares together and finding one turned upside down.

 

 

Using  .25” seam allowances, sew the squares 1 and 2, right sides togther into Strips.

Now Sew the the strips into blocks.

You will have 20 blocks once they are complete.

If you choose to use more than one color for your blocks, next you want to layout your quilt. I use a flannel sheet pinned to corkboards on my wall. But anyway you can find to put them in order and keep them that way works. This is a great time to audition your sashing strips and cornerstones.

 

        

 

Using .25” seam allowance, sew blocks/sashing into strips, and cornerstones/ sashing into strips. 

Using .25” seam allowance, sew Strips into a quilt top…

Adding borders

An earlier addition of Cuttting Corners ran a really great example of adding borders. I have attached the link for that tutorial for help with borders http://www.rileyblakedesigns.com/cutting-corners/2011/11/08/finishing-school-iii/

Quilt and Bind as desired…

Enjoy!

For a secondary colorway visist my bloghttp://mamajamaquilts.blogspot.com/

Thanks for looking!

 

 


Category: Quilts


Comments

  1. Hi Jessica, this is lovely... but the link for the .pdf appears to be dead. Can you post another? Thanks! :)
    by george
    May 07th, 2012 at 2:33 p.m.


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